Kodak Baby Brownie Special (1939)

What is it? This is a Baby Brownie Special made by the Eastman Kodak Corporation between the years of 1939 and 1952.  This model was an upgrade from the simpler Baby Brownie by adding a fixed telescopic viewfinder an integrated shutter release button, and a cloth carrying handle.  Later models …

Reinventing the Roll: 120 Film in a Polaroid Highlander

For those of you like me who grew up in the 1980s, you remember the Polaroid instant camera.  Models like the Spectra and the OneStep were common, shooting instant photographs with Polaroid’s familiar white border.  If you are a little older, you might remember the collapsible SX-70, but no matter …

The Cameras of the Dead: The Reboot (aka Part IV)

The horror genre is known for movie franchises with many sequels, remakes, and reboots.  In the 70s, 80s, and 90s, original horror movies would often spawn a whole series of sequels, mostly upping the ante on the thrills, spills, and chills of the original.  Sometimes the sequels continued the story …

Kodak Brownie Starmatic (1959)

What is it? This is a Brownie Starmatic made by the Eastman Kodak Company of Rochester, NY between the years of 1959 and 1963.  It was the first Brownie camera to have both an exposure meter and automatic exposure.  It is a simple, mostly plastic camera that used 127 roll …

Detrola Model E (1939)

What is it? This is a Detrola Model E camera made by the Detrola Corp out of Detroit, MI.  Detrola was better known for its successful line of radios and record players in the 30s and 40s.  Perhaps trying to mimic the success of Ann Arbor, MI based Argus by …

Kodak Flash Bantam (1948)

What is it? This is a Kodak Flash Bantam, a strut folding camera with a Bakelite and metal body.  The Flash Bantam updated the original Bantam 4.5 with flash synchronization and a new Lumenized lens coating to improve accuracy when using color film.  It used 828 film which was originally …

Kodak Bantam (1935)

What is it? This is a Kodak Bantam, a strut folding camera with an entirely Bakelite body, a single speed shutter, doublet lens, and a maximum aperture of f/6.3.  This was Kodak’s first camera designed for their new 828 format of film.  828 was originally designed to be an inexpensive roll …

Kodak No.1A Pocket Kodak (1926)

What is it? This is a No.1A Pocket Kodak folding camera made by the Eastman Kodak Company between the years of 1926 and 1932.  It used Autographic 116 film which allowed photographers to open a tiny door on the back of the camera and write notes about the exposure which would …

Bolsey B2 (1949)

What is it? This is a Bolsey B2 35mm fixed lens rangefinder camera made by the Bolsey Corporation of America between the years of 1949 – 1956.  The B2 is a very compact and lightweight die-cast aluminum bodied camera that features a lens and shutter both made by Wollensak, out …

Clarus MS-35 (1948)

What is it? This is a Clarus MS-35 camera made by the Clarus Camera Manufacturing Co. based out of Minneapolis, MN.  This was the first and only camera made by Clarus and was sold between the years of 1946 and 1952.  The Clarus MS-35 was an ambitious 35mm rangefinder that …

The Dawn of the Cameras of the Dead

When there’s no more room in hell, the dead will walk the Earth… This is a followup to an earlier post I spontaneously wrote back in August called “The Cameras of the Dead”.  In that article, I applied a tongue in cheek analogy to George Romero’s 1968 classic “The Night of …

Kodak No. 2 Brownie Model D (1914)

What is it? This is a No. 2 Brownie Model D box camera, made by the Eastman-Kodak company around 1914.  The name “Brownie” has been used by Kodak on a huge variety of inexpensive cameras starting with the very first model in 1900, all the way to Bakelite bodied cameras …