Kodak Brownie Starmatic (1959)

What is it? This is a Brownie Starmatic made by the Eastman Kodak Company of Rochester, NY between the years of 1959 and 1963.  It was the first Brownie camera to have both an exposure meter and automatic exposure.  It is a simple, mostly plastic camera that used…

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Detrola Model E (1939)

What is it? This is a Detrola Model E camera made by the Detrola Corp out of Detroit, MI.  Detrola was better known for its successful line of radios and record players in the 30s and 40s.  Perhaps trying to mimic the success of Ann Arbor, MI based…

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Kodak Flash Bantam (1948)

What is it? This is a Kodak Flash Bantam, a strut folding camera with a Bakelite and metal body.  The Flash Bantam updated the original Bantam 4.5 with flash synchronization and a new Lumenized lens coating to improve accuracy when using color film.  It used 828 film which…

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Kodak Bantam (1935)

What is it? This is a Kodak Bantam, a strut folding camera with an entirely Bakelite body, a single speed shutter, doublet lens, and a maximum aperture of f/6.3.  This was Kodak’s first camera designed for their new 828 format of film.  828 was originally designed to be an…

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Bolsey B2 (1949)

What is it? This is a Bolsey B2 35mm fixed lens rangefinder camera made by the Bolsey Corporation of America between the years of 1949 – 1956.  The B2 is a very compact and lightweight die-cast aluminum bodied camera that features a lens and shutter both made by…

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Clarus MS-35 (1948)

What is it? This is a Clarus MS-35 camera made by the Clarus Camera Manufacturing Co. based out of Minneapolis, MN.  This was the first and only camera made by Clarus and was sold between the years of 1946 and 1952.  The Clarus MS-35 was an ambitious 35mm…

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The Dawn of the Cameras of the Dead

When there’s no more room in hell, the dead will walk the Earth… This is a followup to an earlier post I spontaneously wrote back in August called “The Cameras of the Dead”.  In that article, I applied a tongue in cheek analogy to George Romero’s 1968 classic “The…

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